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             RoadRageous Video Course at AIPS -- see clips or register

or here:  Driver Safety Resources at http://www.driversafetyresources.com/index.htm

 



Introduction


How long can we continue as a society when we kill each other on highways at an annual rate five times greater than wars have killed our soldiers since the beginning of the century? This year at least 40,000 people will lose their lives on our highways and more than 3 million will go the hospital with injuries and economic losses of over 200 billion dollars. Psychologically, motorists are at war with each other. In 1999 more than a dozen states passed aggressive driving laws and law enforcement around the country has stepped up various initiatives to curb aggressive drivers. The workplace is directly affected as employee productivity and satisfaction suffers from what they call the number one daily concern: aggressive driving. Teenagers are at risk. Children and the next generation of drivers are at risk.

The 177 million drivers in America today need this course. The fact is that we're a nation of aggressive drivers. We all do it, one way or another. This course is for you, your family, your law enforcement officers, your parents and grandparents, your taxi drivers, your truck drivers. This compelling video course takes a dramatic look at What is aggressive driving and why we are aggressive as drivers. You'll hear through the words of genuine experts in the field--safety leaders, government officials, researchers, psychologists, law enforcement officers, driving school teachers, and commercial or professional drivers. Carefully crafted Learning Modules deliver for each lesson the vocabulary you need to learn, the lesson itself in clear and direct language, a self-assessment test, and follow-up activities. Various Options exist suitable for self-study, distance learning, classroom, small groups or entire departments and fleets.

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The principal objectives
of the RoadRageous video course are:

  1. to raise awareness of the behavior of aggressive driving
  2. to modify aggressive driving behavior
  3. to provide information on alternative methods for dealing with impatience, frustration, anger and intolerance on the roads.

Is also being used with PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS, LAW ENFORCEMENT, MILITARY PERSONNEL, TRAFFIC COURTS, DRIVER EDUCATION SCHOOLS, and INDIVIDUAL HOME STUDY (video by mail or online)

Excellent with the book:  ROAD RAGE AND AGGRESSIVE DRIVING

             RoadRageous Video Course at AIPS -- see clips or register

 

Video Modules


Video Module 1: What Makes us RoadRageous

Curriculum Module 1. Understanding Aggressive Driving

Contents: 15 mins. of video. Defining aggressive driving. Learning how to identify aggressive driving behaviors in oneself and others. Differences between attitudes and behavior. Choice points in decision making. Competitive vs. cooperative driving.

Self-assessment Tests: Degree of Lack of Courtesy; Emotional Driving Tendency

Follow-Up Activity:: How RoadRageous Are You? Take the test and examine your Aggressive Zone, Hostile Zone, and War Zone. Observe yourself in each of these categories. Keep a Driving Log and see if you change over time.


Video Module 2: Who is Driving?

Curriculum Module 2. Strengthening One's Personal Driving Conscience

Contents: 12 mins. of video. How to develop inner standards of driving behavior. How to be aware and manage our negative reaction to another driver. How to be more aware of one's negative emotions behind the wheel. Understanding why we need to hold ourselves accountable for our actions and attitudes.

Self-assessment Tests: Strength of Road Annoyance; Degree of Road Negativity

Follow-Up Activity:: Increasing your awareness of other drivers: What are the Top 12 Complaints of Drivers. Which ones do you do? Observe yourself while you drive and keep notes.


Video Module 3: Attitude is Everything

Curriculum Module 3a. Eliminating Negative Attitudes

Contents: 11 mins. of video. How to neutralize and eliminate harmful attitudes. Driving under the influence of anger. Acknowledging our own negative driving attitudes. Anger distracts the driver. Using the car to punish.

Self-assessment Test: What is My Anger Threshold

Follow-Up Activity:: What is your Impulsivity score as a driver? Take the test. Observe yourself while driving. Write your observations in your Driving Diary.


Video Module 4: Cool Operator--Managing Stress

Curriculum Module 3b. Acquiring Positive Attitudes

Contents: 13 mins. of video. How to develop positive driving attitudes. Stress reduction is up to us. Forming a new view of driving as a highway community. Putting your Driving Conscience in the driver's seat. Enjoying the benefits of positive driving attitudes.

Self-assessment Test: Consequences of Aggressive Driving

Follow-Up Activity:: Observe yourself while driving. Write your observations in your Driving Diary. Review them regularly to see if your driving emotions are changing.


Video Module 5: Acknowledge! Witness! Modify!

Curriculum Module 4. Self-Monitoring Behind the Wheel

Contents: 13 mins. of video. How to observe yourself while you drive. Stress reduction techniques with muscle relaxation. Visualization exercises and training. The ThreeStep Program: Acknowledge, Witness, Modify. The Prime Imperative of staying in control of the situation.

Self-assessment Test: How Much Do You Know About Aggressive Drivers

Follow-Up Activity:: The ThreeStep Driver Self-Modification Program. Acknowledge your mistakes by witnessing them. Observe yourself while driving. Make a list and explain why you do each. Now modify each item, one at a time.


Video Module 6: Those Inconsiderate Jerks!

Curriculum Module 5. Techniques for Dealing With One's Aggressiveness as a Driver

Contents: 8 mins. of video. Recognizing self-destructive patterns of behavior. Taking constructive alternatives for self-empowerment. How compassion gains control over anger. Aggressiveness in driving is a form of control or domination of others. Resisting or retaliating is actually turning over control of the situation to a stranger.

Self-assessment Test: Retaining Control Through Compassion for Ourselves

Follow-Up Activity:: Give yourself feedback on your own driving attitudes. Take this test and reflect on each item. Repeat: It's not worth it! then explain why.


Video Module 7: Me! Me! Me! Look at Yourself

Curriculum Module 6a. Identifying with the Needs of the Driving Community

Contents: 12 mins. of video. What are self-destructive patterns of behavior for a driver? When are we too self-centered as drivers? The power to change our emotional reactions. The benefit of identifying with other drivers as a driving community. How motorists depend on each other in traffic. How our choices affect other drivers.

Self-assessment Test: Degree of Stress From Aggressive Driving

Follow-Up Activity:: Observe yourself while driving. When do you have angry emotions? Try to see how the negative emotion leads to negative thinking about the other driver, and finally to acting out your hostility. Observe the tension and stress that goes with it. Then act the opposite of what you feel like. Notice how you calm down quickly.


Video Module 8: It's Not Worth Dying For

Curriculum Module 6b. Analyzing Choices in Traffic Situations

Contents: 12 mins. of video. How to analyze traffic situations: recognizing their components and people's choice points. We always have choice points. Our responsibility for choice points. Choice points and our Driving Conscience. How to avoid involvement in an angry driving incident.

Self-assessment Test: Scenarios Analysis of Traffic Situations

Follow-Up Activity:: Find a road rage story in the newspaper or on the Web. Analyze the sequence of events and show where the choice points were and where disaster could have been avoided.


Video Module 9: Clear Heads Prevail--Rock On!

Curriculum Module 7. Understanding the Varieties of Impaired Driving

Contents: 12 mins. of video. The varieties of impaired driving: Alcohol, Extreme Anger or Rage, Fatigue, Inexperience, Advancing Age, and Medication or Other Drugs. The basic forms of impaired driving: Compulsion to Take Risks, Blurred or Reduced Vision, Slower Reaction Times, Experiencing Disruptive Effects on Mental Judgment, Inaccurate Perception or Insufficient Alertness, Denial of One's Hostile Emotions. Why am I responsible if I drive impaired? How do I control my impulsivity? Developing a personal Driving Conscience and taking responsibility.

Self-assessment Test: Degree of Awareness of How Victims of Aggressive Driving Are Impacted

Follow-Up Activity:: Discuss the impaired driving issue with friends and family. How aware are they of the varieties of impairment? Tell them what you know.


Video Module 10: I Got a New Attitude

Curriculum Module 8. Starting Your Program of Lifelong Driver Self-improvement

Contents: 7 mins. of video. Choosing a program of lifelong driver self-improvement. Why lifelong training is necessary. Motivation for change. Developing your own driving philosophy. Important concepts to understand: Common Sense, Courtesy, Patience, Interconnections, Interdependencies, Driving Community.

Special section for commercial or professional drivers: The cumulative stress effect of long driving hours and the pressure to perform. How to avoid frustration and anger. How to deal with unexpected delays. Lack of courtesy leads to aggressive driving. The issue of responsibility.

Self-assessment Test: Knowledge of Aggressive Driving Facts and Statistics

Follow-Up Activity:: Visit DrDriving's Web site at DrDriving.org where you'll find additional useful activities and lessons.


Options

All 10 Video Modules are available on separate tapes, which is convenient for public presentations and demonstrations. The entire course is available on a single video tape (1 hour and 29 minutes). Excellent for both self-study at home and classroom or group study.

In a classroom setting, each of the 8 Curriculum Modules is equivalent to a one-hour class, thus 8 hours of classroom time, not counting individual follow-up activities. STUDENT WORKBOOKS available. INSTRUCTOR GUIDE also available.

Distance Education option in the privacy of your home, available.

Please e-mail DrDriving with your specific interest.

 


TRAINING IDEAS from AIPS

Custom tailor a training program which works for you. Listed below are the four most popular training options utilized by our clients. However, each product can be used as a combination of options below to meet your training budgets and schedules.

OPTION A. Train the Trainer

  • Purchase curriculums, workbooks and videotapes in quantities needed to organize a comprehensive in-house training program.
  • Each course package includes detailed instructor how-to guide and can be offered in 30-60 minute modules to fit your training schedule.
  • Trainers learn the curriculum or contract AIPS to sponsor the Instructor Development Workshop.
  • Offer training sessions as needed.

OPTION B. Facilitate In-House Home Study Program

  • A cost-effective way to train new employees, small groups and/or employees disbursed throughout diverse geographical areas.
  • Purchase home-study video kits and student completion kits with workbooks.
  • Circulate video kits to anyone whom you would like to complete the program (One kit can be used for unlimited training).
  • Grade completion paperwork and issue credits.
  • Purchase additional completion kits and workbooks, as needed (need one completion kit/workbook per student).

OPTION C. Distance Learning with AIPS

  • Ideal for organizations without a dedicated training department or for outsourcing a part of the training to reduce annual training costs.
  • Register with AIPS as a referring agency.
  • Send a list of prospective trainees to AIPS or refer trainees to AIPS's 24-hour customer service order line. · AIPS sends the program kit directly to the trainee.
  • Trainee completes the program and returns the completion paperwork to AIPS.
  • AIPS grades the paperwork and notifies the designated representative of successful course completion.

OPTION D. Instructor Leasing Program

Need a guest speaker or an expert? Would you like Dr. Nerenberg to appear at your next training seminar? Want to make your next training session more memorable and fun?
AIPS will provide instructors, speakers, and entertainers for your next training.
Help you to custom tailor and/or humorrze your presentation to resemble a theatrical production.

Please e-mail me for further information or for making arrangements:
Dr. Leon James (DrDriving)

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

“RoadRageous” Classroom Course

Based on the techniques of Dr. Nerenberg’s and Dr. Leon James behavior modification approach; this course is designed to be taught in an interactive classroom setting.

Kit Content: Class Curriculum and “Train the Trainer” Guide divided into eight 30-60 minute modules; Ten supplemental VHS Video Modules; Five Student Workbooks/Completion Kits with quisize="3es, exercises and follow-up activities.

Recommended for use with Training Options: A or D


“RoadRageous” Self-Study Video Course Kit

Employing our unique proprietary Validation System that insures full course completion, each participant can be given an option to complete the program via self-study at their own pace.

Kit Content: “RoadRageous”™ VHS tape (10 modules - 2 hrs. total running time); 5 Student Workbook/Completion Kits, Validation Answer Sheets; Instructor Validation Answer Guide and Key.

REcommended for use with Training Options: B or C with special pricing


“RoadRageous”™ 10 Individual Video Modules

10-15-minute modules on aggressive driving to supplement any existing training curriculum

1. What makes us RoadRageous? – Understanding Aggressive Driving - 15:02 min.
2. Who is Driving? – Developing Inner Standards of Driving Behavior -12:36 min.
3. Attitude is Everything – Eliminating Negative Attitudes - 11:21 min.
4. Cool Operator – Managing Stress Developing Positive Driving Attitudes 14:53 min.
5. Acknowledge! Witness! Modify! – Observing and Improving Driving Skills – 13:15 min.
6. Those Inconsiderate Jerks – Dealing with Aggressive Driving Behaviors – 7:26 min.
7. Me! Me! Me! – Look at Yourself, Identifying with the needs of the Driving Community - 12:21 min.
8. It’s Not Worth Dying For – Analyzing Choices In Traffic Situations -12:12 min.
9. Clear Heads Prevail-Rock On- Understanding The Basic Facts Of And Solutions To Impaired Driving – 11:50 min.
10. I Got A New Attitude – Choosing a Program Of Lifelong Self Improvement - 7:14 min.


“RoadRageous" Student Workbooks and Completion Kits

Complete guide and participation workbook for each student includes quisize="3es, exercises and follow-up activities.

Recommended for use with Training Option: A

A must for use with Training Option: B


“RoadRageous”™Theme Song Audio Tape

Preformed by award winning ___________ , known for a top hit: ________?

Fun way to reinforce course retention


“Aware Driver” Self-Study Course

Our best selling Defensive Driving Video Course based on the proven-effective “Aware Driverä” curriculum.

Presented by award- winning entertainer Steve Verret covers such topics as:

- Driver Attitude and Aggressive Driving Habits
- Collision Avoidance
- Defensive Driving Techniques
- Importance of Seat Belt Use
- DWI/DUI of Alcohol and Other Drugs
- Vehicle Maintenance…and Much More

Kit Content: “Aware Driver” VHS tapes ( 4 hrs. total running time); 5 Student Workbook/Completion Kits, Validation Answer Sheets; Instructor Validation Answer Guide and Key.

Recommended for use with Training Options: B or C with Special pricing


“Aware Driver” Student Wordbooks and Completion Kits

Complete guide and participation workbook for each student, will includes validation sheets and special student instructions.

A must for use with Training Option: B


Distance Learning with AIPS :

Option C - Utilizing “Aware Driver”ä and/or “RoadRageous’ä Self-Study Video Courses with our proprietary Validation Method.

Pricing Includes: Workbooks, Completion Materials and Certification, Student Tracking, 24-hour customer support and shipping.

 


SUPERIOR COURT DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Rufus King III, Chief Judge March 23, 2001


Administrative Order No. 01-07 It is hereby ORDERED that in cases where a violator is convicted in traffic court the person will be required to complete educational programs from the American Institute for Public Safety. This referral process does not change any court administrative procedures. Records will be electronically transferred for processing the violator through the educational programs. Violators who are convicted in traffic court of a coded offense that carries 2-3 points against their driving record are required to take the "Aware Driver" Defensive Driving Course. Violators who are convicted in traffic court of a coded offense that carries 4 to 8 points are required to take the aggressive driver course, "RoadRageous". Violators who are convicted in traffic court of a coded offense that carries more than 8 points will be required to take both courses. This order applies to violators who are residents and non-residents of the District of Columbia. This order shall be effective May 1, 2001.

original here

 

United States Army Forces Command

Freedom's Guradian

FORSCOM News Service

FORSCOM Selects American Institute For Safety Campaign

American Institute for Public Safety News Release

The U.S. Army has selected the American Institute for Public Safety’s innovative interactive programs to help limit loss of life from automotive crashes involving soldiers and their families while operating Privately Owned Vehicles.

The American Institute for Public Safety (AIPS), based in North Miami, Fla., signed a contract in mid-June with the Army’s Forces Command, headquartered at Fort McPherson, Ga.

“The Army is making a step change to save lives,” said Chris O. Huffman, president of AIPS. “The leading cause of death for soldiers is not in combat with the enemy. It’s when they drive in their privately owned vehicle.”

The Army’s safe driving campaign will operate under the “Combat Aggressive Driving” brand name. The campaign that will be built on use of AIPS’ aggressive driver course, called “RoadRageous.”

RoadRageous is the nation’s first comprehensive course on aggressive driving. Presented in eight one-hour segments, the course was developed by AIPS in conjunction with three leading experts on aggressive driving, Dr. Leon James and Dr. Diane Nahl, both of the University of Hawaii, and Dr. Arnold Nerenberg, a Ph.D. psychologist in Southern California known as “America’s road rage therapist."

see original here

 

RoadRageous Video Course at AIPS see clips or register

Soldier Fatalities in Privately Owned Vehicles
is 10 Times Higher Than Loss From All Other Accidents Combined

NORTH MIAMI, Fla. - The U.S. Army has selected the American Institute for Public Safety's innovative interactive programs to help limit loss of life from automotive crashes involving soldiers and their families while operating Privately Owned Vehicles.

The American Institute for Public Safety (AIPS), based in North Miami, Fla., signed a contract in mid-June with the Army's Forces Command, headquartered at Fort McPherson, Ga.

"The Army is making a step change to save lives," said Chris O. Huffman, president of AIPS. "The leading cause of death for soldiers is not in combat with the enemy. It's when they drive in their privately owned vehicle."

The Army's safe driving campaign will operate under the "Combat Aggressive Driving" brand name. The campaign that will be built on use of AIPS' aggressive driver course, called "RoadRageousTM."

RoadRageousTM is the nation's first comprehensive course on aggressive driving. Presented in eight one-hour segments, the course was developed by AIPS in conjunction with three leading experts on aggressive driving, Dr. Leon James and Dr. Diane Nahl, both of the University of Hawaii, and Dr. Arnold Nerenbeg, a Ph.D. psychologist in Southern California known as "America's road rage therapist". James and Nerenberg have testified before Congress on aggressive driving and road rage, now ranked by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration as the leading concern among drivers today. In addition, Nerenberg has taught numerous seminars for the California Office of Traffic Safety and has appeared on major television network newscasts as the recognized expert on aggressive driving and road rage.

The Army campaign will be launched at Fort Bragg, N.C.; Fort Campbell, Ky.; Fort Carson, Colo.; Fort Hood, Texas; Fort Lewis, Wash.; Fort Polk, La., and Fort Stewart, Ga. All three versions of the course will be utilized for Military Police and local law enforcement, general adult education and education for teens.

Huffman said the "Combat Aggressive Driving" program is more than just educational courses. AIPS will coordinate instructor training, public awareness campaigns, and outreach to communities and state and local governments to insure that principles of non-harmful driving are communicated to soldiers, families, and civilians at key Army posts where the "Combat Aggressive Driving" program will be used.

"After extensive research, the Army selected AIPS because we're more than a course provider," Huffman said. "The Army program we designed is an all-embracing campaign that features education, public awareness, community integration with state and local initiatives and even websites to deal with an overall approach to traffic safety. This approach will also include defensive driving, driving under the influence, seat belt usage, child safety seats, distracted driving, cell phone safety and other related auto safety topics.

"This builds on AIPS' success delivering leading-edge driving safety programs in California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, New Jersey, Texas and Washington, D.C.

"Our programs feature new and innovative ways to teach responsible driving to motorists with a proactive approach to behavior modification," Huffman said.

AIPS is a privately held company that delivers behavior-modification programs that improve on-the-road safety by reaching today's motorists using innovative and highly effective teaching and public awareness methods. The company's mission is to save lives and taxpayer dollars through delivery of innovative traffic safety programs.


 

RoadRageous Video Course at AIPS -- see clips or register

RoadRageous AGGRESSIVE DRIVER COURSE


SOLUTIONS FOR AGGRESSIVE DRIVING

THE CORPORATE MARKET

1. Fleet drivers Long/short haul
2. Field /sales reps
3. Service technicians
4. Transporting people
5. Taxis/Limos/Bus drivers etc.
6. Commuters/ car pools/ office based

THE PRODUCT

Created by the world’s leading experts, Dr. Leon James (Dr. Driving) and Dr. Arnold Nerenberg (American Road Rage Therapist)
The only course in the nation that addresses driver behavior and attitudinal modification.
RoadRageoustm addresses the root causes of aggressive driving and changes the way people think, feel and behave behind the wheel.
The product is a course in behavior modification and attitude adjustment for drivers of all ages.
The course utilizes advanced psychological techniques to effect change in the way a person perceives the action of others and their own thoughts and responses.
Anger management tools are a component of the course content and are directed towards aggressive driving and road rage but are applicable to other emotive situations as well.
The course appeals to a broad base audience from fleet drivers to soccer moms to non drivers who wish to reduce and manage their stress on or off the road.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  1. To realize the need for a program of lifelong drover self-improvement.
  2. To get rid of harmful, negative driving attitudes.
  3. To develop and strengthen positive driving values.
  4. To become a less self-centered, aggressive driver and to indentify more with the needs of the community.
  5. To help drivers deal with aggression from other drivers, and also to help them deal with their own aggressiveness and rage.
  6. To help drivers understand why it’s necessary to develop inner standards of behavior.
  7. To understand what aggressive driving is, and how to measure our own aggressiveness as a driver.
  8. To learn how to analyze traffic situations, and recognize the places where people have choices that can determine how those traffic situations turn out.
  9. To learn how to observe our own driving, and use those observations to improve our driving skills.
  10. To understand the basic facts and solutions to impaired driving (DUI, anger, advancing age, inexperience, drugs and medication).

THE PRODUCT

  • The course varies in length from 4 hours to 12 hours depending on the level of detail and delivery techniques
  • Available in the following formats:
  • Classroom with instructor 4 to 12 hours (1hr. segments)
  • Classroom video and facilitator 4 hours (1/2 hr. segments)
  • Distance Learning administered by AIPS
  • Each delivery mechanism includes a student workbook, study guide, overheads, course tests and quisize="3es.
  • Upon successful completion of the course a certificate is awarded.
  • There are also several ancillary products which support and reinforce the messages in the course:
  • Audio tape of "Acknowledge Witness Modify"
  • Stress ball of the "BRAIN"
  • Car fresheners with key messages
  • Stickers
  • Posters
  • "Positive Affirmation" cards

THE COMPETITION

  • The few other products in the market that reference aggressive driving and Road Rage are 10 to 15 minute videos dealing with situations not solutions to Road Rage.
  • RoadRageous with its comprehensive approach to behavior modification and curricula for up to 12 hours of education is unique in the marketplace. It is the only course which effects change to behavior and attitudes behind the wheel.

POSITIONING

RoadRageous is the industry leader and best in class addressing the causes and implementing the cures for aggressive driving and road rage

CONSUMER PROMISE

To save lives and taxpayer dollars. To make the roads a safer environment while improving the quality of life on and off the roads

PRICING

  • VIDEO COURSE $249.00
  • Video course includes 5 workbooks, facilitator guide and certification.
    - Can be taught in class by a facilitator utilizing workbooks and the facilitator guide in 1/2 hr. segments 4 hours.
    - Assign as home-study. 100% completion is insured through our unique validation system
    - Additional workbooks are:
    - 1-499 $8.95
    - 500-999 $7.95
    - 1000 or more $6.95
  • CLASSROOM CURRICULUM $595.00
  • Complete train the trainer guide and class lesson plan
  • Can be taught in 60 minute segments 4 to 12 hours
  • Includes five student workbooks
  • Templates for charts and overhead transparencies
    - Additional workbooks are:
    - 1 to 499 $6.50 each
    - 500 to 999 5.50
    - 1000 > 4.50

THE DISTANCE LEARNING OPTION:

  • Ideal for "outsourcing" your training needs. If you need to trim your budgets, save productive work hours, need to train a large number of people in a short period of time or you are on the road away from the headquarters, distance learning is for you.
  • HOW IT WORKS:
  • Provide the names and addresses and we ship the course directly to the designated employees.
  • Upon completion the student returns the materials to us.
  • With our unique validation system you are assured that each student has watched the video and completed the course in its entirety.
  • We grade the test and certify completion. A certificate of achievement is sent directly to the student and/or his/her supervisor
  • Once your organization is set-up in our system, your employees can call our toll-free number directly and order additional course packets as required.
  • $65 per person
  • Prices include all course materials, workbooks, certificate of completion and training history with audit trail.

RETURN ON INVESTMENT

  • PARTICIPATE IN THE PRESIDENT’S, DOT’S AND NHTSA’S INITIATIVE TO REDUCE AGGRESSIVE DRIVING AND ROAD RAGE
  • LOWER YOUR SHARE OF THE $60 BILLION COSTS
  • LOWER YOUR LIABILITY
  • ADOPT BEST PRACTICE
  • IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY OF WORK FORCE
  • ENHANCE MORALE AND QUALITY OF LIFE FOR ALL EMPLOYEES
  • HOW TO ORDER:

email DrDriving@DrDriving.org


AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC SAFETY
"RoadRageous"™ Aggressive Driver Course

RoadRageous Video Course at AIPS -- see clips or register

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Letter and Analysis -- How Teenagers Think as Drivers

Dear DrDriving,

I'm a 16 year old boy and I was driving in tandem with a friend who is unfamiliar with driving in that area and on the freeway. It was almost midnight and we were driving to our homes. I had a friend from work who invited us to a party but we couldn't find his place so we drove back. I lost the address and all we did was drive around then started to go home. We did not have anything to drink and nobody had taken any drugs.

We got onto the freeway and while we were driving, a black SUV pulled up really fast and close behind my friend's car-who was in the center lane. I was in the left lane and wanted to stay close to my friend so he would not get lost. The SUV swerved around my friend's car to the slow lane and went past really fast. He started to swerve around all the other cars ahead of us and we thought he was gone.

A little bit later he was held up in the traffic and my friend and I were both in the left lane and passed him. My friend and I had to change to another freeway that had only two lanes for a while. The SUV took the same exit and my friend and I thought it was funny that he was behind us and we slowed down in both of the lanes (stupid plan). He pulled up behind me and then behind my friend and began pointing a gun. We got really scared and did everything we could to get away. He followed us really fast but never tried to pass us. This went on for miles. We were all swerving through traffic. I think I was driving about 90 miles an hour. Sometimes we thought he was gone and then we would see that he was just kind of hiding behind other cars. We got close to our exit and I started to flash my lights and honk at my friend so that he knew to take the exit. When we took the exit we saw the SUV follow us then pull over on the off-ramp.

When we got onto the road we were met by lots of police cars. We ended up with tickets for reckless driving and we are going to plead not guilty. We think that this driver did something illegal and could have caused an accident. We know that we were stupid and added to the problem but we think that he's an adult and he was the one who was making it into a battle. What do you think? Do you have any suggestions how to handle this? Thanks.


The letter above was published in our Road Rage and Aggressive Driving book and used as an exercise called Scenario Analysis.

The Chart below identifies the specific chain of steps that together make up this road rage incident. There are 13 bad driving behaviors these two teenagers performed in sequence, as evidenced by their own description of the events (middle column). Your comments should answer two questions: (a) how does each step contribute to their trouble (focus on the bold words in column 2), and (b) how could they have backed out of it at each step by doing something else. Have your friends or family members also complete the exercise, then get together to compare and discuss everybody's solutions. Doing this exercise will strengthen your emotional intelligence as a driver by making you more aware of how your behavior influences other people's behavior on highways.


 

Scenario Analysis of Teen Drivers' Unrecognized Road Rage Behavior

Emotionally challenged behavior

Segment from the letter

State how each step contributes to trouble.

Suggest smarter behavior.

1. Playing games on the highway.

"I'm a 16 year old boy and I was driving in tandem with a friend."

 

 

2. Driving after curfew

"It was almost midnight"

 

 

3. Losing the address and going anyway

"I lost the address and all we did was drive around then started to go home"

 

 

4. Driving abreast occupying center lane and fast (left) lane

"I was in the left lane and wanted to stay close to my friend--who was in the center lane"

 

 

5. Blocking the way so the SUV had to pass in the right (slow) lane

"SUV pulled up really fast and close behind my friend's car-who was in the center lane"

 

 

6. Discounting the seriousness of the incident

"we thought he was gone"

 

 

7. Not realizing they were doing something provocative

"My friend and I were both in the left lane and passed him"

 

 

8. Not realizing that the incident has now escalated into a potential duel

"The SUV took the same exit and my friend and I thought it was funny that he was behind us"

 

 

9. Finally realizing this is trouble but still acting like they're in a duel, escalating the fight instead of backing down

"we slowed down in both of the lanes (stupid plan). He pulled up…and began pointing a gun."

 

 

10. Engaging in reckless driving--weaving through traffic at high speeds getting away from a chase

"We got really scared and did everything we could to get away. He followed us really fast but never tried to pass us. This went on for miles. We were all swerving through traffic. I think I was driving about 90 miles an hour"

 

 

11. Engaging in further provocative behavior by ignoring its potential effect on the pursuer

"I started to flash my lights and honk at my friend so that he knew to take the exit"

 

 

12. Trying to diffuse their own responsibility in the sequence of events, as a sort of denial

"We think that this driver did something illegal and could have caused an accident"

 

 

13. Hiding behind inadmissible excuses, avoiding to admit what they did wrong, and refusing to think objectively about it

"We know that we were stupid and added to the problem but we think that he's an adult and he was the one who was making it into a battle"

 

 

We also want to show this email exchange:

Hi Pedro,
Thanks for writing about the scenario analysis exercise in our book. We'd like to answer you in detail, considering each one of your points:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

From Pedro@aol.com
Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2000
To: DrDriving@DrDriving.org

Subject: In your book on p. 206

TWO TEENAGED DRIVERS GETTING INTO TROUBLE

DrDriving, In the section about "unrecognized teenage road rage behavior" (Or something to the effect), you have a checklist about what they did wrong. I strongly disagree with you about all the points until the two slow down in front of the black SUV.

1. Since when is "driving in tandem" synonymous with "playing games on the highway." Truck drivers drive in "tandem," me and my brother drove in "tandem" when we moved cross country, whenever my family goes to do things together we drive in "tandem." I guess we should all stop "playing games on the highway"

** We grant you that following one another could be legitimate in some circumstances, like this one. Perhaps we thought they were driving neck to neck in parallel lanes--when we wrote this analysis. If you look at step 5, it appears that the two young men are driving parallel to each other when the SUV comes up behind.

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2. The time of day that these two were out is irrelevant. Many areas, thankfully, do not have curfews. Your point of the two being out past curfew is further made irrelevant because, had these two been adults, you would not have mentioned the time of day. Licensed law-abiding drivers have equal entitlement to be on the road regardless of age.

** Generally speaking you are correct, but in this case we're dealing with teen drivers. The driver who wrote says he is 16 and this age group is not treated the same way as 18 and beyond. Graduated licensing laws are especially addressed to this age group. This age group has the highest rate of crashes than any other. Fatalities in car crashes are the leading cause of death for individuals 1 to 23.

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3/4. Just because someone doesn't immediately know where they're going doesn't mean that they are "emotionally challenged," I shouldn't have to give up and go home because I forgot directions and if I want to spend the rest of the night driving around (within the confines of the law) than I should be allowed.

** Yes, you do have that legal right. But here we're talking about learning how to behave reasonably in the eyes of mature people, the law, what's expected as normal by the community, and so on. So it's important and adaptive to make inquiries before you go somewhere unfamiliar. Yes, you have the right to keep looking, not asking, being unsure and unprepared, driving around without a specific purpose or desitnation, and so on. But these behaviors will lead you into trouble and you need to know this in advance so you give yourself the choice of doing it or not.

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5. You say that it was wrong of the center lane driver to hold up the SUV and make him go to the right. I can't count the number of times that someone will zigzag through traffic and come up right behind me. By the time I put on my signal to get over, they have already cut over. I can just imagine what would have happened if I had moved over at the same time they did especially if the don't slow down to accommodate the possibility that I would. This driver had every right to be in that lane and shouldn't have to risk himself and everyone else around him to "jump" out of the way of an **#@ driver. You also get on the one for driving in the left lane. Is driving in the left lane against the law? Did he even have a chance to move to accommodate this **#@? What was he doing wrong?

** It's important to make a distinction between what is illegal behavior and what is emotionally unintelligent behavior. You feel that if some behavior is not illegal then it's all right to do it. But in fact, some behavior may not be illegal, but if some accident or crash develops, that behavior can be found to be a contributory factor. Yes, it's important you consider whether something is morally correct or emotionally intelligent? Many young drivers have difficulty learning this rule of conduct. Driving in parallel isn't safe or prudent. Driving in the left lane except to pass isn't appropriate when it results in other cars having to switch lanes and pass from the right or middle lane.

** Also, the emotion you're displaying by calling the other driver an insulting or obscene name should serve to you as a flag that you need to think this through more carefully, or what we would say, with more emotional intelligence. This will protect you and the people around you whom you could harm in a fit of rage that you later regret. Please continue to read our book and do the exercises. Then write back a little later and see if you then agree with us.

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6. You say that they underestimated the problem they created, something to the effect of "we thought he was gone," Everytime some **#@ cuts around me I should get scared and worried that he's going to hurt me? They didn't create this problem, the guy in the SUV did.

** You're asking if you should worry every time another driver cuts around you. The answer is Yes. You can call it being scared or worrying, but you can also call it being prudent, cautious, competent. You need to remind yourself all the time you're driving that the cars around you are driven by human beings who act and react, and their action and reaction are vital information for you to keep track of all the time. Driving takes mental effort when it's done right. It takes mental presence, which includes full and continuous awareness of where the other drivers are, what they're doing and might be doing. This way you can be supportive of them, helping them do what they want by staying out of their way nad emotional fury. This is emotionally intelligent. And it's your best way to keep in control of the situation. The two teenaged drivers in our analysis lost control of the situation and got into trouble. They didn't like it.

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7. They get criticized for going past him in the left lane. Provoking him? I also can't count the number of times that the example in #5 goes around me to the right or left and hits the wall of traffic in that lane and I end up going past him. Should I slow down my entire lane so that I don't go past him and hurt his feelings?

Also I can laugh at every jack ass who zips in and out of traffic in a usually futile attempt to get ahead, that doesn't mean that I've created a problem, also that guy couldn't see them laughing. I guess these two teen should have started crying and gotten off the road as soon as possible because some guy was driving like a prick.

** Yes, passing him in the left lane is like provoking him. You need to be aware of what provokes another driver so you can then avoid doing that behavior. In this case, they were already in a duel or contest, and so their passing him could easily be taken by the SUV driver as a further step in the duel or contest. In fact, as you can see next, that is how he reacted.

** You do not know if he could see them laugh or not, and maybe they gave out other cues. The point is that their attitude was unintelligent and landed them in trouble by hiding reality and lulling them into foolish behavior.

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8. The left lane driver flashed his lights at his friend not the guy behind him. The **#@ was behind both of them. I've had to lead people who are new to the area to the right exits, I describe the exit as best I can, but when we get near the exit I flash them to confirm that this is the one. My brother and I used our Flash-to-pass to signal when we need gas or a break, etc. Are we supposed to worry that everyone else around us is going to mistake our signal or take it the wrong way?

** Yes. You must take on responsibility for the consequences of your actions on others around you. Emotional intelligence is to know how others will or might react to our actions and take steps to avoid in such a way. We are a community of drivers on the highway and we drive as teamwork. Recognizing this principle is emotional intelligence.

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9. Now is when I believe that they escalated the problem, they shouldn't have slowed the **#@ down. But regardless the guy SHOULD NOT!!!!!! have brandished a weapon. This shows that he was ready for a conflict with someone and unfortunately these two were the ones he had the conflict with. He also demonstrated throughout this ordeal that he was not in control of his emotions.

** Correct. It's also very important for you to realize that the two teenaged drivers could have avoided this trouble. The purpose of our exercise is to help you realize this. Please go through it again and this time you can fill out the other two columns.

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10. If someone pulls a gun on me in traffic, I will go as fast as I can safely go to avoid them.

I showed your book and this story to about 30 people, all ages. None of them can understand what the hell you are talking about (basically implying that teens were at fault for the whole thing) until step 9 when they slow the guy down. But that's the only time that we could see a problem with the teens' driving. We all agree that the guy in the SUV would have conflicted with somebody and that ONLY thing that the teens' shouldn't have done was slow him down

** Talking about this with your friends is an excellent thing to do. It shows you're really interested in this topic. We urge you to do the exercise again, then discuss the whole thing with your friends again. This time however, you'll be able to promote the emotionally intelligent alternatives, and thereby help your friends gain in emotionally intelligence. Please write again and tell us what happened!

Aloha,

Leon James and Diane Nahl
DrDriving.org

NCJA Southern Regional Meeting


Aggressive Driving and the Law

Sponsored by The National Criminal Justice Association and the American Institute for Public Safety in cooperation with the North Miami Beach Police Department
Atlanta, GA 30303

"The RoadRageous course is approved by FDOT and FDLE (Florida) and counts towards the mandated training hours for law enforcement."

Chris Huffman President Chief Operating Officer, American Institute for Public Safety

 


Reader's Digest Health WebMD Broadcast

Thursday, September 28, 2000 4:00 PM EDT

The Neuro Center When Drivers Attack:
Putting the Brakes on Road Rage

Do you ever feel like giving a tailgater a 'brake job'? Do you try to get where you're going in the shortest possible time? Do you curse at or retaliate against 'pushy' drivers? Join our experts to learn about putting the breaks on overly aggressive driving.

We are a nation of aggressive drivers. How long can we continue as a society when we kill each other on highways at an annual rate five times greater than wars have killed our soldiers since the beginning of the century? This year at least 40,000 people will lose their lives on our highways and more than 3 million will go the hospital with injuries and economic losses of over 200 billion dollars, according to the American Institute of Public Safety. Psychologically, motorists are at war with each other. In 1999 more than a dozen states passed aggressive driving laws and law enforcement around the country has stepped up various initiatives to curb aggressive drivers, and psychologists are now starting to view road rage as a very real disorder.

Leon James, PhD, and Diane Nahl, PhD, are the founders of "driving psychology" and the nation's foremost authorities on road rage and aggressive driving. They are the authors of the RoadRageous aggressive driving video course and a related book, Road Rage and Aggressive Driving: Steering Clear of Highway Warfare. Check out their web site, at DrDriving.org.

Chris Huffman is chief operating officer of the American Institute for Public Safety. The institute recently collaborated with such experts as James and Nahl to produce the nation's first comprehensive course devoted to changing the attitudes and behavior of aggressive drivers.

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Chris Huffman is chief operating officer of the American Institute for Public Safety, an organization established in 1995 by Gary Alexander, founder of the Improv Traffic Schools, as a reaction to America's road rage epidemic. Most recently, the institute collaborated with such experts as Leon James, PhD, and Diane Nahl, PhD, to produce the nation's first comprehensive course devoted to changing the attitudes and behavior of aggressive drivers. Huffman is the former executive vice president of Cunard Line, Ltd., and a senior officer at Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, Ltd.

Diane Nahl, PhD, has published dozens of articles in professional journals on human-system interaction, testing search skills, technophobia and information anxiety, and information science research methods. A professor in the information and computer sciences department in the Library and Information Science Program at the University of Hawaii, she researches affective and cognitive behaviors in information searching and organization and their applications to traffic psychology, personality testing, and applied social psychology. Her particular area of focus is driving informatics.

Leon James, PhD, has published more than 50 articles in professional journals in psychology, information science, and education. His professional books have been published with Prentice-Hall, Cambridge University Press, and Newbury House. He was appointed by the mayor of Honolulu to the Oahu Traffic Safety Council. He serves on the Governor's Impaired Driving Task Force of the State of Hawaii. He is a member of the Oahu Trans 2K, A Community-based Transportation Vision for the 21st Century. He is professor of psychology at the University of Hawaii, where he teaches courses in personality development and traffic psychology.

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Arnold Nerenberg, Ph.D.

RoadRageous Video Course by AIPS

"I have had the opportunity to work with Dr. James through our aggressive driving program here in San Antonio. There is no doubt he is the foremost expert on the subject. Through his guidance we have established what I feel is a very comprehensive aggressive driver program here. Voluntary compliance to traffic laws and conditions must be the goal of any aggressive driver campaign and regular and constant awareness and education must play a large part in this effort. Dr. James efforts go a long way in accomplishing this goal.
Tom Polonis, Captain San Antonio Police Department

"The RoadRageous course is approved by FDOTand FDLE (Florida) and counts towards the mandated training hours for law enforcement."

Chris Huffman President Chief Operating Officer, American Institute for Public Safety


NBC NIGHTLY NEWS FEATURES

ROADRAGEOUS AS A SOLUTION TO

"THE EPIDEMIC OF MADNESS ON THE ROAD"

Tom Brokaw

NORTH MIAMI, FL – NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw recently focused on the solutions to aggressive driving and road rage. The national story featured the American Institute for Public Safety's (AIPS) aggressive driver course, RoadRageous. The first comprehensive course in the nation addressing aggressive driving and road rage. The course teaches drivers how to avoid becoming a victim of an aggressive driver as well as controlling their own aggressiveness. It provides the tools to reduce stress and improve the quality of life, health and wellness on today's roadways.

In the news story, reporter Kerry Sanders and his camera crew featured, in part, the Roadrageousä course and the two dozen students who attended the eight-hour class. RoadRageousä is being used in the Miami-Dade County court system as a pilot program for violators.

"Through the help of national and local media, the public is learning that the American Institute for Public Safety has the cure for what has become a national epidemic of aggressive driving and road rage. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) , aggressive driving and road rage is now a greater concern to drivers than DUI " says Chris Huffman, AIPS' chief operating officer.

Said NBC's Sanders in his national news report, "The problem (is) so urgent, angry drivers are now responsible for four times as many deaths on the road as drunk drivers."

NBC also interviewed the co-authors of the course. Dr. Arnold Nerenberg, who is recognized as America's roadrage therapist and Dr. Leon James, a professor of Traffic Psychology at the University of Hawaii who is also known as Dr. Driving. Both are members of AIPS' National Advisory Panel.

"Aggressive driving is like a virus. It's contagious. You see it happen frequently. There's a tendency for other drivers to imitate that same behavior," said National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Henry Rockel.

As Dr. Leon James stated on the NBC report, "There are 177 million licensed drivers today and the entire generation has grown up with the norm of aggressiveness."

Reporter Sanders concluded his report this way, "Shortly, road rage classes will also begin in the Dallas court system utilizing the home study version of the program, a possible solution to the epidemic of madness on the road."

AIPS is the pioneer in using interactive teaching methods, including humor, as a training technique. AIPS uses its proprietary "Interactive Edutainment" technique in all of its attitude and behavior modification courses, classroom and video distance learning. The company has offices in Florida, California, Colorado and Indiana.


From a student:

"I have noticed drastic improvements to my emotions while driving. I wrote about it in my SWR #10. I found that since taking this course and participating in the TEE exercises I am more aware of how I feel. As soon as I feel myself get irritated (while driving), I stop and question why I feel the way I do and then question am I justified in feeling it. This course has made me look at myself and see the error of my ways."


From a student:

"After reading the final Tee card, I tried to treat other drivers as if they were my neighbors. Over the past week I tried to be compassionate towards other drivers even if they were driving slow or driving aggressively. I tried to imagine what the other drivers were going through that particular day and not let my aggressive tendencies get the best of me. It was hard implementing these ideas but I noticed that I have become more patient with other drivers. Not only does this mean a safer environment for myself but for others as well. I know that understanding the emotions of others is important in handling my own emotional intelligence. By doing these Tee cards the last couple of weeks, I came to realize how important it is to manage our emotional intelligence. By doing this, I know that the tendencies of road rage will decrease as fellow drivers utilize some compassion for others."


Tips and Programs for Safer Driving -- Web Links

http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/signs_index.htm
This link is a really great site to go to!! There are links to traffic signs, markings, and signals. If you read through this you will become more educated on our streets and roadways and learn even more driver communication signals.

http://www.caa.ca/english/automotive/auto%20tips/driving%20with%20childre n.html\
This site is just full of information and tips on how to drive with a child as a passenger. I think that this can help you if you have a child, or a younger sibling, or even if you ever or will ever drive with a child in your car.

http://www.smartmotorist.com/tip/tip.htm
This website gives a list of 21 smart driving tips for new drivers. I liked it because it helps to promote safe driving from the beginning. It also gives other helpful tips about drowsy driving and how to stay patient while driving.

http://www.smartdriver.co.nz/Articles/Emotional%20Intelligence.htm
Smart Driver is a website that provides a lot of good information and tips for drivers. They give you online training on how to be a good and safe driver. This particular link in the website is about emotional intelligence and goes over the three types of drivers and how to become a supportive driver.

http://www.nsc.org/library/facts/defdriv.htm
This website tells people that driving defensively is a good thing. When driving, you should always be careful and be aware of other drivers. This is true and this is definitely better than being an oppositional driver but I picked this website because it forgets to mention that defensive driving can make a driver competitive and suspicious of other drivers. It was interesting that so many websites call defensive driving “good”driving.

http://www.drdriving.org/articles/three_step.htm
This was important in the reading so that people know how to deal with their road rage.  The article talks about the three step program and how you can benefit from each of the stages.  It even says that there is a test kit to find out what kind of driver you really are.

 http://www.smartmotorist.com/tip/tip.htm
This little segment gives information on the self help process.  It gives twenty-one different tips on how to prevent becoming an aggressive driver and to prevent any accidents from happening.  Even those who are not beginning drivers can benefit from this segment because it gives a model of what a person should be like when driving a vehicle.

 http://www.kidshealth.org/teen/safety/safebasics/driving_safety.html
This article mainly describes the importance of defensive driving and tips on how to be a defensive driver.  It tells of how people multi-task that put others in danger.  Defensive driving means to be alert at all times and to watch out for other people as well as yourself.

http://www.ncsl.org/programs/transportation/transer7.htm#attempts
This article seems like it is a document made to legislature to alert the government of the increasing problem of aggressive driving.  In the article, it identifies problems and ways to combat aggressive driving.  The article starts to show how people are becoming more aware of aggressive driving problems.

http://www.familycar.com/Driving.htm
various tips for safe driving

www.drivingskillsforlife.com
skills for life while driving

www.roadsafety.com
Systems and software to ensure safe and efficient operation of motor vehicles, including products aimed at teen drivers and emergency vehicles

http://www.drivingskillsforlife.com/
This website teaches people driving skills.  It goes beyond what people learn in drivers education and is aimed more towards new drivers.  This website offers videos to watch as well as exercises.

http://www.drivingtactics.com/
This website gives you some interesting tactics that you can use to help you to prevent an accident.  They say that these tactics could even save you life as well as the lives of your loved ones.  It gives you situations and the tactics you can use to prevent an accident.

http://phobiafreeway.com/skills.html
I chose this website because it teaches useful techniques on how to reduce stress.  I also gives you a list of things that may signal that you are stressed. It lists physical, psychological, and behavioral signals.  This website talks about things to do with driving psychology.


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