Home>Statistics, Facts & Advice>Statistics -- Part 1

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Driving Advice and Links


Statistical Information compiled and edited by Dr. Leon James

Please note that some outside links will not work because the original document is no longer available from the originating site.


Basic Facts Every Driver Needs to Know

The cost of motor vehicle crashes and injuries in 1990 was $138 billion, representing the present value of lifetime economic costs for 45,000 fatalities, 5.4 million non-fatal injuries, and 28 million damaged vehicles.

Components of this total cost include:

  • property damage at 33%

  • workplace and household productivity at 37%

  • medical and rehabilitation at 10%

  • legal and insurance at 20%

  • Per fatality cost:

  • Workplace productivity........................$510,000

  • Household productivity......................... 113,000

  • Medical & emergency........................... 5,900

  • Legal................................................. 80,000

  • Premature funeral................................ 3,400

  • Insurance............................................ 55,000

  • Property damage................................. 10,000

  • Total.................................................. $785,000


Traffic Fatalities Data, 1966 - 1994

 

Year  Fatalities   Drivers (1)    Cars (1)    VMT (2)   Fatality rate (3)

1966    50,894         100,998         95,703        926         5.5

1967    50,724         103,172         98,859        964         5.3

1968    52,725         105,410         102,987     1,016     5.2

1969    53,543         108,306         107,412     1,062     5.0

1970    52,627         111,543         111,242     1,110     4.7

1971    52,542         114,426         116,330     1,179     4.5

1972    54,589         118,414         122,557     1,260     4.3

1973    54,052         121,546         130,025     1,313     4.1

1974* 45,196         125,427         134,900     1,281     3.5

1975    44,525         129,791         125,402     1,328     3.4

1976    45,523         134,036         130,731     1,402     3.2

1977    47,878         138,121         134,887     1,467     3.3

1978    50,331         140,844         140,978     1,545     3.3

1979    51,093         143,284         144,805     1,529     3.3

1980    51,091         145,295         146,845     1,527     3.3

1981    49,301         147,075         149,330     1,553     3.2

1982    43,945         150,234         151,148     1,595     2.8

1983    42,589         154,389         153,830     1,653     2.6

1984    44,257         155,424         158,900     1,720     2.6

1985    43,825         156,868         165,382     1,774     2.5

1986    46,087         159,487         168,137     1,835     2.5

1987**46,390         161,818         172,366     1,921     2.4

1988    47,087         162,853         176,752     2,026     2.3

1989    45,582         165,555         180,792     2,096     2.2

1990    44,599         167,015         183,934     2,144     2.1

1991    41,508         168,995         186,052     2,172     1.9

1992    39,250         173,125         184,864     2,240     1.8

1993    40,150         173,149         188,453     2,297     1.7

1994    40,676         175,128         192,337     2,347     1.7

Year  Fatalities    Drivers (1)      Cars (1)    VMT (2)   Fatality rate (3)

Note: The fatality reporting criteria was changed in 1973. Before then, a person who was involved in a crash and then died as many as 365 days later was considered a fatality related to that crash. The 365-day window was reduced to 30 days in 1973. NHTSA adjusted the data to reflect that, but it still may not provide a perfect "apples-to-apples" comparison.


Are you ready for the road?

Each year in Canada, neglected maintenance leads an untold number of deaths and disabling injuries, as well as costs associated with lost wages, medical expenses and property damage.

The Canadian government does not track the number of deaths that are caused by neglected maintenance, however, we know that in the United States, each year, neglected maintenance leads to more than 2,600 deaths, nearly 100,000 disabling injuries and more than $2 billion in lost wages, medical expenses and property damage.

Most mechanical failures can be traced to neglected maintenance.

For example, the U.S. Department of Transportation reports the leading cause of mechanical breakdown on US highways is overheating, a condition that is easily avoidable. Other deficiencies that are simple to detect include low antifreeze/coolant, worn or loose drive belts and defective cooling system hoses. Checking tire pressure and inflating a tire costs nothing and can avoid a blowout and a serious accident.

Car Care Canada offers these fuel-saving tips:

1. Vehicle gas caps -- About 17 percent of the vehicles on the roads have gas caps that are either damaged, loose or are missing altogether, causing over 25 million litres of gasoline to vaporize each year.

2. Under inflated tires -- When tires aren�t inflated properly it�s like driving with the parking brake on and can cost a cent or two every two litres.

3. Worn spark plugs -- A vehicle can have either four, six or eight spark plugs, which fire as many as 3 million times every 1,500 kilometres, resulting in a lot of heat and electrical and chemical erosion. A dirty spark plus causes misfiring, which wastes fuel. Spark plugs need to be replaced regularly.

4. Dirty air filters -- An air filter that is clogged with dirt, dust and bugs chokes off the air and creates a �rich� mixture -- too much gas being burned for the amount of air, which wastes gas and causes the engine to lose power. Replacing a clogged air filter can improve gas mileage by as much as 10 percent, saving about 5 cents per litre.

Fuel-saving driving tips include:

1. Don�t be an aggressive driver -- Aggressive driving can lower gas mileage by as much as 33 percent on the highway and 5 percent on city streets, which results in 2 to 15 cents per litre.

2. Avoid excessive idling -- Sitting idle gets zero miles per litre. Letting the vehicle warm up for one to two minutes is sufficient.

3. Observe the speed limit -- Gas mileage decreases rapidly at speeds above 100 kph. Each kph driven over 100 will result in an additional 3 cents per litre. To maintain a constant speed on the highway, cruise control is recommended.

WIPERS - Although climates vary, wipers generally need replacing every six months. An easy reminder is to change wiper blades in the spring and fall when you change your clock. Be sure the windshield washers are working properly, too, and keep the reservoir filled with solvent.

LIGHTING - Another important pre-trip check should be exterior and interior lighting. In the United States, vehicle check lanes revealed an overall failure rate of over 25 percent in the lighting category. Car Care Canada reminds motorists to check their lights monthly. Other suggestions from Car Care Canada include turning on headlights both day and night. This helps define your car�s position on the road, and its distance from other drivers. When your vehicle�s lighting is defective, other motorists may not get the message that you intend to stop or turn. The end result could be disastrous. Traffic deaths occur three times more often at night. Whiter headlights can improve driver reaction time and make it easier to avoid road hazards.

Ten-minute pre-trip checkup can pay off

Car Care Canada offers three suggestions for a traveler�s 10-minute pretrip checklist:

1. Check all fluids. There are several fluids, in addition to antifreeze, that require attention, including engine oil, power steering, brake and transmission fluids and windshield washer solvent and antifreeze/coolant.

2. Check hoses and belts. A belt that fails can affect the electrical system, air conditioning and power steering, as well as the cooling system. Cooling system hoses may be deteriorating from within, so old hoses and clamps in marginal condition might need to be replaced.

3. Check the tires. Check tire inflation and inspect the tread for uneven wear, indicating the need for wheel alignment. Also look for bulges and bald spots.

�While a last minute checkup is better than no checkup, motorists should plan ahead to allow time to perform necessary maintenance themselves or at the local service facility. A properly maintained vehicle is safer and more dependable and will even save a few dollars at the gas pumps,� said Car Care Canada�s Marc Brazeau.

Not only can a pre-trip inspection help reduce chances of costly and possibly dangerous road trouble, it also provides an opportunity to have repairs made at home, with one�s own technician who knows the vehicle.

Especially important, it provides peace of mind. While no inspection can guarantee a car�s performance, it�s comforting to know proper precautions were taken.

From: http://kingscorecord.canadaeast.com/friendsneighbours/article/267704



Government agency facts

There were 187.2 million licensed drivers in the United States in 1999. Young drivers, between 15 and 20 years old, accounted for 6.8 percent (12.7 million) of the total, a 1.2 percent decrease from the 12.8 million young drivers in 1989.

In 1999, 8,175 15- to 20-year-old drivers were involved in fatal crashes — a 15 percent decrease from the 9,671 involved in 1989. Driver fatalities for this age group decreased by 16 percent between 1989 and 1999.

For young males, driver fatalities dropped by 20 percent, compared with a 3 percent decrease for young females (Table 3).

Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for 15 to 20 year olds (based on 1997 figures, which are the latest mortality data currently available from the National Center for Health Statistics).

In 1999, 3,561 drivers 15 to 20 years old were killed, and an additional 362,000 were injured, in motor vehicle crashes.

In 1999, 15 percent (8,175) of all the drivers involved in fatal crashes (56,352) were young drivers 15 to 20 years old, and 18 percent (1,964,000) of all the drivers involved in police-reported crashes (11,194,000) were young drivers.

“Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for people

Figure 1. Driver Fatalities and Drivers Involved in Fatal Crashes Among Drivers 15 to 20 Years Old, 1989-1999

In 1999, the estimated economic cost of police-reported crashes involving drivers between 15 and 20 years old was $32.2 billion.

When driver fatality rates are calculated on the basis of estimated annual travel, the highest rates are found among the youngest and oldest drivers. Compared with the fatality rate for drivers 25 through 69 years old, the rate for teenage drivers (16 to 19 years old) is about 4 times as high, and the rate for drivers in the oldest group is 9 times as high.

When driver fatality rates are calculated on the basis of estimated annual travel, the highest rates are found among the youngest and oldest drivers. Compared with the fatality rate for drivers 25 through 69 years old, the rate for teenage drivers (16 to 19 years old) is about 4 times as high, and the rate for drivers in the oldest group is 9 times as high.

Motorcycles

During 1999, 163 young motorcycle drivers (15-20 years old) were killed and an additional 6,000 were injured. Helmets are estimated to be 29 percent effective in preventing fatalities among motorcyclists.

NHTSA estimates that helmets saved the lives of 551 motorcyclists of all ages in 1999, and that if all motorcyclists had worn helmets, an additional 326 lives could have been saved. During 1999, 45 percent of the motorcycle drivers between 15 and 20 years old who were fatally injured in crashes were not wearing helmets. Of the young motorcycle drivers involved in fatal crashes in 1999, more than one-fourth (27 percent) were either unlicensed or driving with an invalid license.

Alcohol

NHTSA defines a fatal traffic crash as being alcohol-related if either a driver or a nonoccupant (e.g., pedestrian) had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.01 grams per deciliter (g/dl) or greater in a police-reported traffic crash. Persons with a BAC of 0.10 g/dl or greater involved in fatal crashes are considered to be intoxicated. This is the legal limit of intoxication in most states.

In 1999, 21 percent of the young drivers 15 to 20 years old who were killed in crashes were intoxicated. Table 4. Alcohol Involvement Among Drivers 15 to 20 Years Old Involved in Fatal Crashes, 1999 “In 1999, 21 percent of the young drivers who were killed in crashes were intoxicated.”

All states and the District of Columbia now have 21-year-old minimum drinking age laws. NHTSA estimates that these laws have reduced traffic fatalities involving drivers 18 to 20 years old by 13 percent and have saved an estimated 19,121 lives since 1975. In 1999, an estimated 901 lives were saved by minimum drinking age laws.

Seventeen states have set 0.08 g/dl as the legal intoxication limit, and all states plus the District of Columbia have zero tolerance laws for drivers under the age of 21 (it is illegal for drivers under 21 to drive with BAC levels of 0.02 g/dl or greater).

Figure 3. Cumulative Estimated Number of Lives Saved by Minimum Drinking Age Laws, 1975-1999

For young drivers 15 to 20 years old, alcohol involvement is higher among males than among females. In 1999, 24 percent of the young male drivers involved in fatal crashes had been drinking at the time of the crash, compared with 11 percent of the young female drivers involved in fatal crashes.

Drivers are less likely to use restraints when they have been drinking. In 1999, 73 percent of the young drivers of passenger vehicles involved in fatal crashes who had been drinking were unrestrained. Of the young drivers who had been drinking and were killed in crashes, 79 percent were unrestrained.


115 people die each day from traffic crashes


About 115 people die each day from traffic crashes in the U.S. Nearly 42,000 people die every year from traffic crashes, sending four million more to emergency rooms and hospitalizing 400,000, half with permanent disabilities. On-the-job traffic crashes cause 3000 deaths, 332,000 injuries and cost employers over $43 billion, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and can reduce employee productivity by 40 percent.

In addition to the emotional toll, on-the-job traffic crashes annually cost employers about $3.5 billion in property damage, $7.9 million in medical care and emergency service taxes, $17.5 billion for wage premiums, $4.9 billion for workplace disruption (to hire and train either new employees or temporary employees) and $8.5 billion in disability and life insurance costs.


How do Americans define aggressive driving?

Responses by percentage
Is this act aggressive? Percentage of Americans who say YES
Tailgating 88%
Making rude gestures 86
Passing on the shoulder 83
Failing to yield to merging traffic 83
Pulling into a parking space someone else is waiting for 80
Flashing high beams at the car in front of you 68
Waiting until the last second to merge with traffic on the highway 60
Driving through a yellow light that is turning red 58
Changing lanes without signaling 58
Honking the horn 52
Double parking 52
Driving 10 mph or more over the speed limit 47
Driving 10 mph or slower under the speed limit 26

METHODOLOGY
A nationally representative telephone survey of 998 adult licensed drivers was conducted by Global Strategy Group between June 29 and July 2, 1999. Concurrent telephone surveys were conducted with approximately 100 adult licensed drivers in each of five cities—Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C. The following provides a summary of the key findings from the national and city-specific surveys. The margin error is + 3.1%

original here

 


Road Deaths Around the World
 

  Country             Deaths/100k Vehicles (1998)
   
  S. Korea   80.33
  Turkey   76.75
  Poland   55.71
  Portugal   35.02
  France   30.24
  Denmark   21.44
  USA   19.97
  Iceland   16.87
  Italy   16.71
  Canada   16.65
  Germany   15.71
  UK   12.73
  Sweden   11.81
Source: German Federal Highway Research Institute
see original article here


LINKS TO STATISTICS FOR CRASH FATALITIES

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov) has many studies and fact sheets that summarize crash data.

The Federal Highway Administration annual Highway Statistics report (http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/ohim/1996) is the source of raw data on traffic crashes, including various disaggragations (by mode, state, etc.).

The Bureau of Transportation Statistics (http://www.bts.gov) also has crash data (pretty much the same as FHWA).

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (http://www.highwayssafety.org) has summary reports. Their month "Status Report" has themes, which included urban crashes in May 1998, and pedestrian crashes, in March 1999. It also provides crash cost data by vehicle model, so consumers can increase their own safety, (www.carsafety.org).

For an excellent study of pedestrian/bicycle crashes (in New York city) see the recent report "Killed by Automobile" by the group Right of Way (http://www.rightofway.org).

original article here


Annual Crashes, Injuries, and Fatalities from NHTSA

The following exhibits represent twelve years of GES and FARS data
(including the 1999 preliminary estimates):

Exhibit 1
Motor Vehicle Traffic Data, 1988 - 1999

Year Crashes Injuries Fatalities
1988 6,887,000 3,416,000 47,087
1989 6,653,000 3,284,000 45,582
1990 6,471,000 3,231,000 44,599
1991 6,117,000 3,097,000 41,508
1992 6,000,000 3,070,000 39,250
1993 6,106,000 3,149,000 40,150
1994 6,496,000 3,266,000 40,716
1995 6,699,000 3,465,000 41,817
1996 6,770,000 3,483,000 42,065
1997 6,624,000 3,348,000 42,013
1998 6,335,000 3,192,000 41,471
1999* 6,289,000 3,200,000 41,345

 


Mean Rating of Safety of Select Driving Behaviors
 

Qx: People feel differently about how safe or dangerous different types of driving behavior are. How safe do you feel it is to ...?
Base: Total population of drivers
Unweighted N: A=1,489; B=1,511; C=1,4567; D=1,533; AC=2,956; BD=3,044
Mean rating is on a five-point scale where
1=extremely safe and
5=extremely dangerous.
Unweighted N Mean Rating of Safety by Age
16-20 21-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+
Drive through a light that was already red before you enter an intersection AC 4.55 4.70 4.68 4.72 4.79 4.77 4.78
Drive 10 miles an hour faster than most other vehicles are going AC 3.39 3.45 3.47 3.79 3.80 3.90 3.88
Drive 20 miles an hour over the speed limit on an interstate highway BD 3.74 3.86 3.82 4.02 4.08 4.11 4.30
Tailgate another vehicle on a highway with one lane in each direction AC 4.54 4.66 4.68 4.74 4.74 4.74 4.74
Enter an intersection just as the light is turning from yellow to red BD 3.74 3.89 4.18 4.16 4.25 4.22 4.17
Drive through a stop sign without slowing AC 4.65 4.82 4.79 4.83 4.84 4.85 4.76
Slow but not completely stop at stop sign BD 3.82 3.83 4.09 4.21 4.34 4.42 4.38
Cut in front of another car in order to make a turn BD 4.57 4.62 4.73 4.77 4.83 4.86 4.78
Race another driver AC 4.70 4.83 4.90 4.86 4.90 4.90 4.94
Drive when just under legal alcohol limit AC 4.79 4.75 4.80 4.75 4.78 4.82 4.73
Use the shoulder to pass in heavy traffic BD 4.37 4.48 4.70 4.72 4.79 4.78 4.73
Make an angry, insulting or obscene gesture or comment toward another driver so that they heard or saw it BD 4.07 3.93 4.27 4.43 4.49 4.53 4.70
Cross railroad tracks when the red light is blinking A 4.68 4.76 4.82 4.77 4.79 4.86 4.89
Pass a vehicle in a no-passing zone B 4.58 4.65 4.74 4.76 4.82 4.83 4.86
Drive 10 miles an hour over the speed limit on an interstate highway A 3.29 3.19 3.21 3.43 3.39 3.66 3.99
Made a U-turn where a sign said not to A 4.22 3.93 4.13 4.18 4.33 4.48 4.74
Drive 20 miles an hour faster than most other drivers are going BD 4.32 4.44 4.33 4.47 4.58 4.60 4.49
Drive through traffic switching quickly back and forth between lanes A 4.16 4.31 4.50 4.58 4.68 4.65 4.79
Pass a school bus that has its red lights flashing and the stop arm is in full view D 4.86 4.85 4.95 4.95 4.96 4.96 4.94
Going 10 miles an hour over the speed limit in a residential neighborhood C 4.17 4.34 4.53 4.54 4.62 4.64 4.64
Go 10 miles an hour over the speed limit on a two-lane rural road D 3.39 3.56 3.55 3.72 3.82 4.01 4.18
Driving 20 miles an hour over the speed limit on a rural road C 3.84 4.17 4.24 4.40 4.45 4.51 4.45

The information presented in Table 3-2 is presented again in Table 3-2a with some of the mean safety ratings shaded. The mean ratings for "Driving when just under legal alcohol limit" are used as an index of safety. The assumption used in this selection is that it is generally agreed that driving while impaired by alcohol is dangerous. Mean ratings meeting or exceeding the index value for each age group are shaded and appear in bold face type.


Maximum Safe Speed for Various Road Types

Qx: What do you consider to be the maximum safe speed for [road type]?
Base: Total population of drivers.
Road Type Unweighted N First Quartile1 Median2 Third Quartile3
Residential Urban 1,320 25 MPH 30 MPH 35 MPH
Residential Rural 834 25 MPH 30 MPH 35 MPH
Non-Interstate Urban 1,016 45 MPH 50 MPH 55 MPH
Non-Interstate Rural 894 50 MPH 55 MPH 60 MPH
Interstate Urban 938 65 MPH 70 MPH 70 MPH
Interstate Rural 606 65 MPH 65 MPH 70 MPH
1 The point at which 25% of the responses fall below and 75% fall above.
2 The point at which 50% of the responses fall above and below.
3 The point at which 75% of the responses fall below and 25% fall above.
The median and one of the quartiles can fall at the same point when a large number of responses are clustered at that point.

There was a great deal of agreement among drivers regarding the maximum safe speed for the six road types. For four of the road types the middle 50%, sometimes called the inter-quartile range, of responses had a range of only 10 miles per hour and in the other two road types the range was only five miles per hour. Drivers felt the maximum safe speed for residential streets, whether in urban or rural settings, was 25 to 35 miles per hour. The maximum safe speed for non-interstate (roads with posted speed limits of 45 to 55 miles per hour) urban roads was 45 to 55 miles per hour, while the same roads in a rural setting were rated at 50 to 60 miles per hour. Interstate highways, regardless of setting, were rated at 65 to 70 miles per hour.

 


Power Tool


"Studying and remembering driving facts is an inner power tool by which you can influence your "inner driver" to take less risks and be more community oriented on the highway." Leon James and Diane Nahl, DrDriving.org
  1. In 1994, 40,676 people lost their lives in motor vehicle crashes, an increase of 1.3% from 1993.

  2. An average of 111 persons died each day in motor vehicle crashes in 1994 -- one every 13 minutes.

  3. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for every age from 6 through 28 years old (based on 1991 data).

  4. From 1982 through 1994, it is estimated that safety belts saved 65,290 lives (9,175 in 1994).

  5. An estimated 2,655 lives were saved by child restraints from 1982 through 1994.

  6. In fatal crashes, 73% of passenger car occupants who were totally ejected were killed. Safety belts are very effective in preventing total ejections: only 1% of the occupants reported to be using restraints were totally ejected, compared with 20% of the unrestrained occupants.

  7. In 1994 there were 16,589 fatalities in alcohol-related crashes which represents an average of one alcohol-related fatality every 32 minutes.

  8. NHTSA estimates that alcohol was involved in 40.9% of fatal crashes in 1994. [this fact was questioned by Mr. Brian Hochmuth of the National Motorists Association as follows:
    "One statistic that I would ask that you change that is glaringly wrong is number 8, "NHTSA estimates that alcohol was involved in 40.9% of fatal crashes in 1994. " For 1996 NHTSA reported that only 25% of all fatal accidents were alcohol related and of those 19.4% involved Blood Alcohol Levels of .10 and above. I haven't seen the 1997 numbers, but I would imagine that that level has dropped even lower."]

  9. In 1994, 32.2% of all traffic fatalities occurred in crashes in which at least one driver or pedestrian had a BAC of .10 or greater.

  10. More than 1.5 million drivers were arrested in 1993 for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics; an arrest rate of 1 for every 117 licensed drivers in the United States

  11. NHTSA estimates that minimum drinking age laws have saved 14,816 lives since 1975.

  12. The 2,304 motorcyclist fatalities accounted for 6% of total fatalities in 1994.

  13. The motorcycle fatality rate per 100 million vehicle miles traveled is about 20 times that of passenger cars. Excessive speed was the contributing factor most often noted. Motorcycle operator error was identified as a contributing factor in 76% of fatal crashes involving motorcycles in 1994.

  14. "16    year old drivers are more than 20 times as likely to have a crash as the general population of drivers."     American Academy of Pediatrics

  15. "Motor vehicle crashes a re the leading cause of deaths in 15 to 20 year olds." National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

  16.  
  17. NHTSA estimates that 518 lives were saved by the use of motorcycle helmets in 1994.

  18. 11% (4,544) of all motor vehicle traffic fatalities reported in 1994 involved heavy trucks (gross vehicle weight rating greater than 26,000 pounds).

  19. 1.5% (608) of the fatalities involved medium trucks (gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 to 26,000 pounds).

  20. Medium and heavy trucks accounted for 8% of all vehicles involved in fatal crashes in 1994.

  21. 3/4 of the medium and heavy trucks in fatal crashes in 1994 collided with another motor vehicle in transport.

  22. Only 1.4% of the drivers of medium and heavy trucks involved in fatal crashes in 1994 were intoxicated. (Compared with 19.4% for passenger cars, 22.9% for light trucks and 28.9 percent for motorcycles).

  23. There were 30,780 occupant fatalities in passenger vehicles in 1994.

  24. Single-vehicle crashes accounted for 41% of all fatal crashes. Multi-vehicle crashes 42%. 17% were non-occupant crashes.

  25. Frontal impacts accounted for 62% of passenger vehicle occupant fatalities where the impact of the vehicle is known.

  26. Ejection accounted for 27% of occupant fatalities in passenger vehicles.

  27. Occupant of light trucks experienced almost twice the ejection rate of passenger cars.

  28. Utility vehicles experienced the highest rollover involvement rate of any vehicle type in fatal crashes (37%) compared to 25% for pickups, 18% for vans and 15% for passenger cars.

  29. 66% of passenger vehicle occupant fatalities were unrestrained.

  30. Drivers of light trucks have a higher intoxication rate (22.9%) than that of passenger car drivers (19.4%).

  31. There are over 23 million people ages 70 years and older in the United States.

  32. In 1994, 13% of all motor vehicle traffic fatalities and 18% of all pedestrian fatalities were older people.

  33. Older drivers involved in fatal crashes in 1993 had the lowest proportion of intoxication (5.5%) of any age group.

  34. In two-vehicle crashes involving an older driver and a younger driver, the vehicle driven by the older person was 3 times as likely to be the one that was struck (56% vs. 16%).

  35. In 44% of these crashes, both vehicles were proceeding straight at the time of the collision.

  36. In 28% the older driver was turning left -- 9 times as often as the younger driver.

  37. 16-24 year olds represent 24% of total fatalities compared to 8% from ages 1-15. 43% for ages 25-54. 24% for ages 55 and over.

  38. On a per population basis, drivers under the age of 25 had the highest rate of involvement in fatal crashes among all age groups.

  39. The male fatal crash involvement rate per 100,000 population was 3 times as high as for female drivers in 1994.

  40. 22% of male drivers involved in fatal crashes were intoxicated compared to 11% of female drivers.

  41. 37% of female drivers involved in fatal crashes were unrestrained at the time of the crash compared to 47% for male drivers involved in fatal crashes.

  42. In 1994, there were 5,472 pedestrian fatalities which represented 13% of total fatalities.

  43. On average, a pedestrian is killed in a motor vehicle crash every 96 minutes.

  44. More than one-third of children between 5 and 9 years old killed in motor vehicle crashes were pedestrians.

  45. In 6% of the crashes, both the driver and the pedestrian were intoxicated.

  46. 802 pedalcyclists were killed in motor vehicle crashes in 1994. (that’s 2% of total fatalities).

  47. For 72% of the pedalcyclists killed in motor vehicle crashes in 1994, police reported one or more errors or other factors related to the cyclist's behavior. The factor most often noted was "failure to yield right-of-way," followed by "walking with or against traffic" and improper crossing of the roadway or intersection."

  48. The factors most often noted for drivers were "driving too fast for conditions or exceeding the speed limit" (17%), "vision obscured" (14 percent) and "driver inattentiveness (talking, eating, etc.)" (13%).

  49. Two people die for every 100 million miles travelled in the U.S.

  50. The male fatal crash involvement rate per 100,000 population was 3 times as high as for female drivers in 1994. Female drivers continue to exhibit safer driving statistics than male drivers.

  51. On average, a pedestrian is killed in a motor vehicle crash every 96 minutes.

  52. Every minute of every day of every year, a young person between the ages of 15-20 is injured in a motor vehicle crash.

  53. One out of every three teens will have an accident in the first two years of driving.

  54. An average of 111 persons died each day in motor vehicle crashes in 1994 - one every 13 minutes.

  55. In a single day in the U.S., 57,000 drivers are involved in a collision, of whom 5,500 suffer injuries, and 120 die.

  56. In the U.S. each year there are 40,000 deaths and 5 million car crashes, costing 150 billion dollars in medical expenses and lost productivity.

  57. From 1982 through 1994, it is estimated that safety belts saved 65,290 lives (9,175 in 1994).

  58. About 2 in every 5 Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash at some time in their lives.

  59. Of the 37,000 fatal crashes in 1995, 6% or 2200 deaths, were cited as involving "inattentive driving" by police.

  60. American drivers ate an average of 13 meals in a car in 1996.

  61. A young mother is forced to jump to her death over a Detroit bridge by a motorist she had sideswiped

  62. A High School student in Honolulu was convicted of causing the death of an off duty policeman who fell over a highway rampart in a scuffle with the youth after they both stopped to settle the score that started with tailgating and a chase

  63. A Cincinnati woman is facing vehicular manslaughter charges for causing the death of an unborn child after a tailgating and chase battle with a pregnant driver ended with an overturned car

  64. An Auckland (New Zeland) irate motorist followed a school bus driver back to the garage, "scorched his ears and pinned him to the bus with his car As of July 1997, no one has yet claimed the temporary insanity defense against road rage violence one is accused of

  65. check it out in this survey

    Automobile Accident Facts in 1997 for the US.    Original here.

 


Automobile Accident Facts in 1997 for the US.

Deaths 43,200
Disabling injuries 2,300,000
Cost $200.3 billion
Motor-vehicle mileage 2,531 billion
Registered vehicles in the United States 214,500,000
Licensed drivers in the United States 181,700,000
Death rate per 100,000,000 vehicle miles 1.71
Death rate per 10,000 registered vehicles 2.01
Death rate per 100,000 population 16.1


Accident and Vehicle Totals, 1997

Type of Accident Number of Accidents Drivers (Vehicles) Involved
Fatal 38,200 59,700
Disabling injury 1,500,000 2,700,000
Property damage and nondisabling injurya 12,300,000 21,100,000
Total (rounded) 13,800,000 23,900,000


Leading causes of traffic accidents in Michigan that have killed 7,106 people between 1990-94

1. Failure to keep in proper lane, running off road 3,175 (45%)
2. Driving too fast for conditions, speeding 1,732 (24%)
3. Failure to Yield right-of-way 1,551 (22%)
4. Failure to obey traffic signs or signals 869 (12%)
5. Hit and run 592 (8%)
Manner of Collision Between Vehicles
Angle = 1,542 Head On = 1,062
From: Dangerous Roads--An I-Team Exclusive by Mike Wendland at www.wdiv.com/fars1.html


Total Killed or Injured in US in 1995

(DOT Bureau of Transportation Statistics at: http://www.bts.gov/ )
Vehicle Occupants 9,000
Drivers 62,00
Passengers 90,000
Non-motorists 161,000
Pedestrians 1,081,000
Pedal cyclists 2,186,000
Vehicle Occupants 267,000
Total 3,428,000
From: The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety in Arlington, Va., says that 22 percent of urban crashes involve the disregarding of traffic controls.


March 14, 2000 Letter

"I just encountered a person with terrible road rage today on my way to school, I go to a community college. Anyways he was tailgating me from when I left my town on a small route, then he would back off, then he would be tailgating me again. When I finally go to a stop sign before hitting the interstate I threw my hands up like what do you want me to do? And he totally flipped out. He almost ran off the onramp and hit me. Then he got in the passing lane and wouldn't let me over. He just kept screaming at me. When I would get behind him to pass someone else he would slow down to 60 or 65, then when I would try to pass him on the right he sped up to around 80 or 85. This went on for a while until another car got behind me when we were passing a semi and this guy started getting angry at me like the last guy did.

Finally the guy must have sped up to 85 or 90 and eventually slowed down again and I finally passed him. As I was getting off the interstate he sped up to follow me. I pulled into a McDonald's and he didn't see me. But he went to the gas station next to it and was standing outside of his car just staring at me as I drove away. This guy really scared me. I wanted to call the state police but I didn't know the number. I'm at school right now and I keep looking over my shoulder. I'm even afraid to drive home today. I copied down his license plate number. Should I turn it into the police? I'm afraid that next time he could have a gun or something and he lives in my hometown.

What do I do if he follows me home or something? And the sad part is that this was an older gentlemen I'd say in his 50s or 60s. Why would he act this way? Especially towards a young girl in her late teens and I even look younger than that. I'm really frightened and I'm not sure what to do. What should I do the next time something like this happens? I was wondering if anyone here could help. I would really appreciate it.

Thanks. "


More Statistics
 

  1. An average of 111 persons died each day in motor vehicle crashes in 1994 - one every 13 minutes.

  2. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for every age from 6 through 28 years old (based on 1991 data).

  3. From 1982 through 1994, it is estimated that safety belts saved 65,290 lives (9,175 in 1994).

  4. The male fatal crash involvement rate per 100,000 population was 3 times as high as for female drivers in 1994. Female drivers continue to exhibit safer driving statistics than male drivers.

  5. More than 1.5 million drivers were arrested in 1993 for driving under the influence of alcohol or narcotics; an arrest rate of l for every 117 licensed drivers in the United States (1994 data not yet available).

  6. About 2 in every 5 Americans will be involved in an alcohol-related crash at some time in their lives.

  7. NHTSA estimates that minimum drinking age laws have saved 14,816 lives since 1975.

  8. There were 30,780 occupant fatalities in passenger vehicles in 1994. This is approximately 90 percent of total occupant fatalities (passenger cars 64 percent, light trucks 26 percent).

  9. 66 percent of passenger vehicle occupant fatalities were unrestrained.

  10. Two people die for every 100 million miles traveled in the U.S.

  11. There are over 23 million people ages 70 years and older in the United States. In 1994, this age group comprised 8.9 percent of the total U.S. resident population, compared with 6.8 percent in 1975. From 1975 to 1994, this older segment of the population grew 3 times as fast as the total population.

  12. In 1994, 13 percent of all motor vehicle traffic fatalities and 18 percent of all pedestrian fatalities were older people.

  13. Older drivers involved in fatal crashes in 1993 had the lowest proportion of intoxication (5.5 percent) of any age group.

  14. In two-vehicle crashes involving an older driver and a younger driver, the vehicle driven by the older person was 3 times as likely to be the one that was struck (56 percent vs. 16 percent). In 44 percent of these crashes, both vehicles were proceeding straight at the time of the collision. In 28 percent the older drivers was turning left - 9 times as often as the younger driver.

  15. 16-24 year olds represent 24 percent of total fatalities compared to 8 percent from ages 1-15, 43 percent for ages 25-54, and 24 percent for ages 55 and over.

  16. On a per population basis, drivers under the age of 25 had the highest rate of involvement in fatal crashes among all age groups.

  17. The intoxication rate for 16-20 year old drivers in fatal crashes in 1994 was 14.1 percent. The highest intoxication rates were for drivers 21 to 24 and 25 to 34 years old (28.1 percent and 26.8 percent, respectively).

  18. The male fatal crash involvement rate per 100,000 population was 3 times as high as for female drivers in 1994. Female drivers continue to exhibit safer driving statistics than male drivers.

  19. Males accounted for 67 percent of total fatalities, 68 percent of all pedestrian fatalities, and 86 percent of all pedalcyclist fatalities in 1994.

  20. 22 percent of male drivers involved in fatal crashes were intoxicated compared to 11 percent of female drivers.

  21. 37 percent of female drivers involved in fatal crashes were unrestrained at the time of the crash compared to 47 percent for male drivers involved in fatal crashes.

  22. In 1994, there were 5,472 pedestrian fatalities which represented 13 percent of total fatalities.

  23. On average, a pedestrian is killed in a motor vehicle crash every 96 minutes.

  24. More than one-third of children between 5 and 9 years old killed in motor vehicle crashes were pedestrians.

  25. On Canadian highways, 1 in 5 drivers has been drinking; 1 in 20 drivers is impaired; upwards of 50% of driver fatalities involve alcohol, and at least 38% of these drivers are impaired.

  26. Every minute of every day of every year, a young person between the ages of 15-20 is inured in a motor vehicle crash.

  27. There has been a 35% increase in traffic in the decade from 1987 to 1996, while new road construction was up only 1%

  28. NHTSA estimates that in 1996 alone, 28,000 deaths and 1 million injuries were primarily due to aggressive driving


Traffic Fatalities Data, 1966 - 1994

 

Year  Fatalities   Drivers (1)    Cars (1)    VMT (2)   Fatality rate (3)

1966    50,894         100,998         95,703        926         5.5

1967    50,724         103,172         98,859        964         5.3

1968    52,725         105,410         102,987     1,016     5.2

1969    53,543         108,306         107,412     1,062     5.0

1970    52,627         111,543         111,242     1,110     4.7

1971    52,542         114,426         116,330     1,179     4.5

1972    54,589         118,414         122,557     1,260     4.3

1973    54,052         121,546         130,025     1,313     4.1

1974* 45,196         125,427         134,900     1,281     3.5

1975    44,525         129,791         125,402     1,328     3.4

1976    45,523         134,036         130,731     1,402     3.2

1977    47,878         138,121         134,887     1,467     3.3

1978    50,331         140,844         140,978     1,545     3.3

1979    51,093         143,284         144,805     1,529     3.3

1980    51,091         145,295         146,845     1,527     3.3

1981    49,301         147,075         149,330     1,553     3.2

1982    43,945         150,234         151,148     1,595     2.8

1983    42,589         154,389         153,830     1,653     2.6

1984    44,257         155,424         158,900     1,720     2.6

1985    43,825         156,868         165,382     1,774     2.5

1986    46,087         159,487         168,137     1,835     2.5

1987**46,390         161,818         172,366     1,921     2.4

1988    47,087         162,853         176,752     2,026     2.3

1989    45,582         165,555         180,792     2,096     2.2

1990    44,599         167,015         183,934     2,144     2.1

1991    41,508         168,995         186,052     2,172     1.9

1992    39,250         173,125         184,864     2,240     1.8

1993    40,150         173,149         188,453     2,297     1.7

1994    40,676         175,128         192,337     2,347     1.7

Year  Fatalities    Drivers (1)      Cars (1)    VMT (2)   Fatality rate (3)

Note: The fatality reporting criteria was changed in 1973. Before then, a person who was involved in a crash and then died as many as 365 days later was considered a fatality related to that crash. The 365-day window was reduced to 30 days in 1973. NHTSA adjusted the data to reflect that, but it still may not provide a perfect "apples-to-apples" comparison.


Sobering Facts to Remember


Only cigarette smoking and heart disease kill more people than automobile accidents in America.

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In Philadelphia, the Daily News found that red-light running is the No. 1 cause of accidents.

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A review of city accident records suggest Philadelphia's driving culture is pure hell. Injuries from accidents caused by aggressive driving have climbed in each year since 1991.

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Car accidents are the No. 1 cause of death and injury among children.

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Alcohol was involved in 41% of all traffic fatalities in 1994, resulting in 17,000 deaths.

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Each alcohol-related death costs our nation an average of 37 years of life lost--in contrast to 16 years for cancer and 12 years for heart disease.

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There has been a steady increase in DWI rates and alcohol-related fatal crashes among women, especially younger women.

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DWI or DUI accounted for about 1.4 million arrests in 1994, about the same as arrests for larceny or theft, or arrests for drug abuse.

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In 1996, about 35% of college students report having driven after drinking alcoholic beverages.

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More than 50% of the people jailed for DWI are repeat offenders.

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Raising the minimum drinking age to 21 has been credited with saving 15,000 lives so far. Some States saw a decrease of up to 38% in young motorists deaths.

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States that enacted and enforced an ALR law (Administrative License Revocation) experienced a decline of up to 9% in drunk driving crashes.

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Research shows that parents tend to seriously underestimate their children's drinking.

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It is believed that police sobriety checkpoints are one of the most effective measures police can use to deter drunk driving. Other methods include:

  • supporting local chapters of MADD, SADD, RID
  • supporting judicial efforts to combat impaired driving
  • promoting DD or "Designated Driver" programs
  • getting involved in National Drunk and Drugged Driving (3D) Prevention Month activities every December
  • supporting zero-tolerance laws and other anti-DWI laws in your community.

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The cost of motor vehicle crashes and injuries in 1990 was $138 billion, representing the present value of lifetime economic costs for 45,000 fatalities, 5.4 million non-fatal injuries, and 28 million damaged vehicles.

Components of this total cost include:


  • property damage at 33%

  • workplace and household productivity at 37%

  • medical and rehabilitation at 10%

  • legal and insurance at 20%

  • Per fatality cost:

  • Workplace productivity........................$510,000

  • Household productivity......................... 113,000

  • Medical & emergency........................... 5,900

  • Legal................................................. 80,000

  • Premature funeral................................ 3,400

  • Insurance............................................ 55,000

  • Property damage................................. 10,000

  • Total.................................................. $785,000

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Nearly 100,000 pedestrians are injured in motor vehicle accidents each year in the United States, with a majority of these accidents taking place in urban areas.

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"Highway crashes cost the Nation $150.5 billion a year. We estimate that about one-third of these crashes and about two-thirds of the resulting fatalities can be attributed to behavior associated with aggressive driving." NHTSA's Administrator Dr. Ricardo Martinez

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The risk of getting in a wreck quadruples when drivers are talking on the phone and have not trained themselves for this new skill.

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To reduce your chances of getting into a road rage fight, let pushy drivers have their way.

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Male drivers of all age groups are involved in more crashes than their female counterparts (Table X). Crash Involvement per 1,000 Licensed Drivers in by Age and Sex, 1988 - 90 -- Go See the Table

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Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for children and adults age 6 to 28, and the leading cause of long-term disability for all age groups. Last year, 41,000 died in car crashes in the United States. Another 3.5 million suffered injuries that ranged from sprained ankles to life-long paralysis. Go see Citizens Against Speeding & Aggressive Driving

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Britain's Automobile Association is examining the use of aroma therapy to reduce road rage through a device that heats pleasant-smelling oils and wafts them throughout the car to help keep the driver calm.

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The phrase "road rage" officially entered the English language in 1997 when it was first listed in the New Words edition of the OED (Oxford English Dictionary).

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Human action was the leading cause of accidents on British Columbia roads in 1995, accounting for 68 per cent of all crashes. Of the types of human action that led to crashes, driving without due care was No. 1. It accounted for 27 per cent of those accidents. Speeding, in contrast, caused 17 per cent and tailgating caused only 12 per cent.

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More than 2 million Americans died in car crashes during the first century of our car society (1896-1996).

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In North Carolina, 1 in 4 (25%) 16-year-olds is in a motor-vehicle crash during that first year of driving. For 17-year-olds the rate is 1 in 5 (20%). In nearly 40% of these crashes, someone is killed or injured (NCDOT, 1995). The rate of seat belt use for high school students in North Carolina is 10% lower than drivers in general (Marchett, 1993).

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Roadside survey results of random driver testing at night for various countries (Alcohol Health and Research World, 1993, vol. 17, p.214):

Country Percent drivers who are legally drunk
(night time random road side tests)
Nordic countries:
Finland, Norway, Sweden
1%
United States 8%
Great Britain 3%
Netherlands 4%
France 5%
Canada 5% to 8%
Percentages are rounded off


Are Women Drivers Becoming More Aggressive?


Here are two segments on the topic. One is a Reuters article that appeared at InfoBeat news service. The other appeared in a MEDIA RELEASE--17 September 1997 of the AAMI Insurance association. The two are apparently from the same source.

09:35 AM ET 12/08/97

Women no longer give way in battle for road

MELBOURNE, Australia (Reuters) - Young women are the new hot-heads of the road, according to an Australian study which found they are almost as prone to road rage as young men.

The study commissioned by an insurance firm has found that female drivers aged below 30 are only slightly less likely to tail-gate, hurl abuse, shake their fists, blast their horns and cut in front of other drivers as any young man.

An aggression index, compiled from a survey released at the weekend by the Australian Associated Motor Insurers Ltd (AAMI), shows young women have hit 31.77 points on a road rage ``Richter'' scale, less than a point shy of men on 32.63.

Young women and men rated the highest on the aggression index, which ranged from 0-100.

``Everyone else's road rage index has actually decreased, but the young women's index has increased,'' AAMI spokesman Michael Kay told Reuters Monday.

``Women are now taking their place as equals in society and there are some good things that happen as a result and, perhaps, some not-so-good things,'' he added.

But women mellow faster than men with age, the study found. Women aged over 55 barely register on the road rage index.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Significant reduction in rate of accidents - good news for motoristsŠ. but young women drivers are exhibiting significant aggressive driving tendencies.

The national accident claims incidence rate of motor vehicles in Australia has reached the lowest level in four years.

The national rate for the 12 months to 31 August 1997 was 13.3 per cent compared to 13.8 per cent for the corresponding year.

This coincides with a 12.4 per cent drop in the number of road fatalities in Australia in the first nine months this year, compared to the corresponding period last year. Between 1 January and 30 September this year 1301 people were killed on Australian roads. In the same period last year, the figure was 1485.

(The Claims Incidence Rate is the number of policyholders per 100 who have accidents in a given year).

The benefit for motorists and insurers alike is that the reduction in the incidence rate should see most premiums remain virtually unchanged for the first time in many years. Despite the increase in smash repair costs and theft on a national basis, AAMI believes the 3.8% drop in the incidence rate in the year ended 31 August 1996-97, would be equal to about $200 million being slashed from the national motor insurance claims bill.

Other significant findings of the third AAMI Crash Index were:

Nose to tail accidents accounted for 27.3 per cent of all collisions in the year to 30 June 1996-97, compared to 25.9 per cent in the year to 30 June 1995-96, a rise of 5.2%. While there was a 15% drop in nose to tail accidents in Tasmania in the year ended 30 June 1996-97, Victoria and New South Wales recorded rises of 6.3% and 5.6% respectively in the same period. The number of single car accident claims dropped 2.9% from 14.3 per cent of all accidents in the year to 30 June 1995-96 compared to 13.9 per cent in the year to 30 June 1996-97. New South Wales had the highest incidence rate of 14.9 per cent in the year to 31 August 1996-97. But this was still down 2.7% compared to the figure of 15.3 per cent in 1995-96. For the same period, North Queensland recorded the largest overall drop from 11.5 per cent to 10.2 per cent, a fall of 12.7%.

An independent study conducted by the respected research firm, Brian Sweeney & Associates, for AAMI, found that more and more young women drivers were copying the sorts of aggressive behaviour of their male counterparts.

The study found aggressive driving behaviour continued to be a significant issue confronting Australian motorists.

The key findings of the survey were:

39 per cent of drivers (up 12%) toot their horns at cars to draw attention to the errors of other drivers. One in five drivers gesticulate at other motorists when angry at them. 7 per cent of drivers tailgate other motorists and flash their headlights when angry. Nearly two thirds of all motorists (64 per cent) say they frequently encounter motorists who get unreasonably angry without real provocation. Six out of every 10 drivers regard the roads as a battlefield. Young and middle-aged male drivers are the most likely to oppose strict road policing and driver penalties. Young male and female drivers are far more likely than older drivers to speed and drive when tired.

Reasons for the drop in the national crash incidence rate is thought by AAMI to be attributable to a number of factors which include:

Dry weather caused by the El Nino effect has meant safer driving conditions. All major cities recorded a significant drop in rainfall, with the exception of Sydney which recorded a nominal increase - drier roads equate to lower crash rates. Historic trends show that as the economy tightens, the incidence rate reduces.

Significant contributors have undoubtedly been the role of the State police forces and insurers including AAMI, as well as the bi-partisan commitment Australia-wide to the road toll and driver education.

These views are supported by the Sweeney Study of the AAMI Crash Index.

Some of the study�s findings included:

90 per cent of motorists say there is no excuse for drink driving. Two thirds of motorists support further tightening of drink driving legislation. Women are generally more supportive of an increased police presence than males. Three quarters (or 75 per cent) of all motorists agree police are doing a good job in terms of road safety. Nearly half (or 48 per cent) of motorists would like to see more speed cameras as a further deterrent to dangerous driving and more than 70 per cent would like to see more police on the roads. Only one in seven motorists (14 per cent) believe there are too many motoring rules and regulations.

While the reduction in the incidence rate is good news for every Australian motorist, in AAMI�s view, there are still long term danger areas.

Young drivers - male and female - continue to have accidents at rates up to 50 per cent higher than more mature motorists.

AAMI also asks every Australian motorist to consider their frame of mind when driving. Lack of concentration accounts for the majority of accident claims. The Crash Index reveals that more than half of all accidents are caused by motorists either failing to give-way or simply running into the car ahead.

Aggressive driving behaviour is still prevalent and on the increase - particularly among younger people. AAMI continues to recommend more comprehensive, graduated licences and driver training for young drivers as a first step in preparing them for the responsibilities they face on the roads.

For further information:

Copyright 1997 AAMI Limited, ACN 004 791 744


Deaths from leading external causes


Deaths from leading external causes by sex and age, registered during calendar year 1996. Source: Published data, NZHIS. Further information is available from NZHIS. For more detailed statistics, see the NZHIS publication series 'Mortality and Demographic Data'.
Age group (years) Motor vehicle accidents Other transport accidents Accidental drownings
Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female
0-14 50 28 22 1 1 0 34 22 12
15-24 186 143 43 13 12 1 15 11 4
25-34 102 79 23 18 15 3 11 10 1
35-44 54 36 18 7 7 0 6 5 1
45-54 44 27 17 17 17 0 7 3 4
55-64 36 30 6 7 6 1 3 2 1
65-74 30 18 12 4 3 1 7 5 2
75 and over 35 20 15 1 1 0 8 2 6
Total: 537 381 156 68 62 6 91 60 31

Age group (years) Accidental poisoning Accidental falls Suicide and self-inflicted injury
Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female
0-14 3 1 2 1 1 0 7 3 4
15-24 1 1 0 8 5 3 143 105 38
25-34 1 1 0 8 7 1 142 121 21
35-44 7 4 3 3 3 0 80 66 14
45-54 11 6 5 11 10 1 63 46 17
55-64 0 0 0 8 6 2 39 34 5
65-74 1 1 0 29 16 13 42 34 8
75 and over 2 2 0 199 73 126 24 19 5
Total: 26 16 10 267 121 146 540 428 112

Age group (years) Homicide All other causes of accidents All accidents, poisonings and violence
Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female
0-14 7 3 4 16 10 6 119 69 50
15-24 18 9 9 15 13 2 399 299 100
25-34 19 15 4 20 16 4 321 264 57
35-44 9 6 3 22 19 3 188 146 42
45-54 6 5 1 20 15 5 179 129 50
55-64 4 3 1 9 7 2 106 88 18
65-74 4 2 2 8 7 1 125 86 39
75 and over 2 2 0 27 9 18 298 128 170
Total: 69 45 24 137 96 41 1,735 1,209 526


 
  BAC .00 BAC .01-.09 BAC .10+ Total Killed in Alcohol Related Crashes Total Killed
  Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent
Age                    
<5 599 79.2 55 7.3 103 13.6 158 20.8 757 100.0
5-9 637 80.1 53 6.7 105 13.2 159 19.9 796 100.0
10-14 792 79.5 82 8.2 122 12.3 204 20.5 996 100.0
15-19 3,389 66.7 518 10.2 1,177 23.2 1,695 33.3 5,084 100.0
20-24 2,213 45.6 532 11.0 2,108 43.4 2,640 54.4 4,853 100.0
25-29 1,720 47.4 359 9.9 1,547 42.7 1,906 52.6 3,626 100.0
30-34 1,504 45.6 304 9.2 1,494 45.2 1,798 54.4 3,302 100.0
35-39 1,670 47.1 299 8.5 1,573 44.4 1,872 52.9 3,542 100.0
40-44 1,596 50.6 293 9.3 1,265 40.1 1,558 49.4 3,154 100.0
45-49 1,499 56.6 213 8.1 934 35.3 1,147 43.4 2,646 100.0
50-54 1,334 62.4 162 7.6 644 30.1 805 37.6 2,139 100.0
55-59 1,208 69.4 120 6.9 412 23.7 532 30.6 1,740 100.0
60-64 1,090 74.6 101 6.9 271 18.5 372 25.4 1,462 100.0
65-69 1,194 80.1 82 5.5 214 14.4 297 19.9 1,491 100.0
70-74 1,371 83.5 94 5.8 176 10.7 270 16.5 1,641 100.0
75+ 3,664 88.6 204 4.9 269 6.5 473 11.4 4,137 100.0
Unknown 56 53.5 7 6.3 42 40.1 49 46.5 105 100.0
Total 25,536 61.6 3,479 8.4 12,456 30.0 15,935 38.4 41,471 100.0


  BAC .00 BAC .01-.09 BAC .10+ Total Killed in Alcohol Related Crashes Total Killed
  Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent
AGE                    
<15 2,029 79.6 190 7.5 330 13.0 520 20.4 2,549 100.0
15-20 3,958 64.2 637 10.3 1,573 25.5 2,210 35.8 6,168 100.0
21+ 19,493 59.7 2,645 8.1 10,511 32.2 13,156 40.3 32,649 100.0
Unknown 56 53.5 7 6.3 42 40.1 49 46.5 105 100.0
TOTAL 25,536 61.6 3,479 8.4 12,456 30.0 15,935 38.4 41,471 100.0

Facts --    Part    1 | 2 |

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Compiled and Edited by Dr. Leon James